Thursday, November 8, 2012



ANTINOUS is the best religious figure for gays seeking spiritual fulfillment, according to American author, pundit and journalist DAN SAVAGE.

When a gay man wrote to his internationally syndicated sex-advice column SAVAGE LOVE asking which religion he would recommend, he replied, "I would go with Antinous."

Here's how Dan explained his choice:

I know you were raised Catholic but are now an atheist. I'm curious if you might still believe in God if you took the time to expose yourself to other faith traditions that are more accepting of gay people. Have you looked at Buddhism or Hinduism? There is a great deal of evidence for reincarnation, and what better way to say "it gets better" than by saying you get to do it again and again until you get it right? —Born Again And Again

The Catholic Church's stance on homosexuality gave me a big sad when I was an adolescent, it's true, but I didn't come to the conclusion that there is no God based solely on that big sad. My sexuality prompted me to question not just the faith in which I was raised, BAAA, but all faiths. And none, in my semi-informed opinion, stood up to scrutiny. I simply don't know how any reasonable person can look at all world religions, living and dead, and come to the conclusion that one particular tribe or prophet or science-fiction writer got it right and every other tribe, prophet, and science-fiction writer got it wrong.

But if I was gonna pick a faith based on gayness alone, I would go with Antinous. He was the big gay lover of the big gay second-century Roman emperor Hadrian, the dude who built the wall that kept Mary Queen of Scots from sneaking into Roman Britain and stealing the scones of stones or something. Hadrian, a bearish guy in his 40s, was hopelessly in love with Antinous, a Bithynian teenager. Hadrian's Bithynian ... must have given amazing head because after Antinous died — he drowned while swimming in the Nile — Hadrian had him declared a god. Take it away, Wikipedia:

"The grief of the emperor knew no bounds, causing the most extravagant veneration to be paid to Antinous' memory. Cities were founded in his name, medals struck with his likeness, and cities throughout the east commissioned godlike images of the dead youth for their shrines and sanctuaries. ... As a result, Antinous is one of the best-preserved faces from the ancient world."

My husband Terry looks like Antinous — it's true — so, yeah, I'd hit and/or worship that.

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